Latest from EHE Health

Last updated march 27, 2020

EHE Health is focused on helping our members, their families, and the community stay as safe as possible during the COVID-19 outbreak. To do so, we’ve closed our offices and clinics in accordance with public health guidance. We anticipate rescheduling patients—this includes appointments at our clinics and at network provider locations—for appointments starting on April 13, 2020. In the interim, we will be providing updates and digital resources here to help you stay healthy during this challenging period.


Are you an EHE Health client partner? Download our COVID-19 toolkit here. 

Latest from the CDC

LAST UPDATED MARCH 27, 2020

  • Different parts of the country are experiencing different levels of COVID-19 activity.
  • The United States is in the initiation phase of the pandemic.
  • States in which community spread is occurring are in the acceleration phase.
  • 27 U.S. states are reporting community spread of COVID-19.
  • COVID-19 cases in the U.S. include:
    • Imported cases in travelers
    • Cases among close contacts of a known case
    • Community-acquired cases where the source of the infection is unknown

EHE Health COVID-19 webinar series

COVID-19 – The Facts and Looking Forward

EHE Health CEO, David Levy, and guest panelists Gail Rosselot, NP, MS, MPH, and Dr. Seema Sarin discussed the developing facts surrounding COVID-19 and what to consider as we move forward. 

New Video Available to View Now

KEEP A POSITIVE ATTITUDE WHILE KEEPING YOUR DISTANCE.

To reduce the spread of COVID-19, social distancing has become an essential part of daily life. In general, people should stay at least 6 feet away from each other and avoid groups. This is certainly disruptive but there are ways to make this “new normal” work for you and your family.
stay connected.

Social distance is important, but so is social connection. Texts, group video chats, and regular phone calls are vital to combating isolation and enhancing community.

keep perspective.

Social distance will save lives. It’s a sacrifice now, but the more widely it’s practiced, the healthier we’ll all be, and the sooner the spread of COVID-19 will slow.

no commute? no problem.

If you’re working from home these days, the benefits can go beyond limiting your COVID-19 exposure. Use this time to get more sleep, exercise in the morning, and cook healthier meals at night—all essential for good immune function.

PREVENTION TIPS

Cover sneezes and coughs with your sleeve or a tissue.

Avoid groups and try to keep a distance of 6 feet from others.

Wash your hands often with soap for at least 20 seconds.

Healthy Working from Home

Working from home can be stressful under these circumstances.
Here are a few tips to stay healthier and happier.

GET OUTDOORS

Try to get some fresh air. Take a bike ride or walk around the neighborhood to move your body and clear your head. 

Create a home team

Don’t isolate yourself if living alone. If quarantining, call or video chat with coworkers, family, and friends to keep making emotional connections.

Stick with reliable sources

It’s natural to tune in to the media. Just make sure you’re getting new information from reliable sources and not listening to the same news repeatedly.

Ease into it

Finding a new normal takes time. Be patient with yourself as you create new routines to stay focused and productive.

Limit screen time

At work, you would probably take a few screen breaks throughout the day. Turn off the TV and step away from monitors and social media to give your mind a rest.

GET OUTDOORS

Try to get some fresh air. Take a bike ride or walk around the neighborhood to move your body and clear your head. 

Create a home team

Don’t isolate yourself if living alone. If quarantining, call or video chat with coworkers, family, and friends to keep making emotional connections.

Stick with reliable sources

It’s natural to tune in to the media. Just make sure you’re getting new information from reliable sources and not listening to the same news repeatedly.

Ease into it

Finding a new normal takes time. Be patient with yourself as you create new routines to stay focused and productive.

Limit screen time

At work, you would probably take a few screen breaks throughout the day. Turn off the TV and step away from monitors and social media to give your mind a rest.

COVID-19 Coping Strategies

Dr. Seema Sarin, EHE Health Director of Lifestyle Medicine, shares her best recommendations for managing the anxiety brought on by the coronavirus.

EHE Health Answers Your Questions 

Is ibuprofen not safe for COVID-19 symptom treatment?

It is recommended to take acetaminophen (Tylenol) for high fever reduction and to prevent dehydration. There is no evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen, are unsafe. However, some COVID-19 patients who took NSAIDs experienced side effects, and it is believed that these medications can negatively impact a patient’s immune system. 

Will a face mask protect me? 

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends only wearing a face mask if you are sick with COVID-19 symptoms or if you are in contact with someone who has COVID-19. The most effective way to protect yourself is to practice social distancingespecially from individuals who are coughingand to frequently wash your hands for at least 20 seconds. 

Will COVID-19 be less dangerous when the weather gets warm? 

It is currently not known whether temperature impacts the spread of COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The common cold and influenza spread more during cold weather months, and flu season typically subsides in March and April. However, since COVID-19 is a new virus, nothing should be assumed about its relationship to weather. 

Can I get COVID-19 from my pet? 

There is no current evidence that companion animals like cats and dogs can get or spread COVID-19 to humans. However, since all animals can carry germs that can make people sick, it’s recommended that you practice good hygiene habits like washing your hands after interacting with pets. If you’re ill, it’s advisable that another household member care for pets while you recover.  

Will influenza or pneumonia vaccines protect me at all? 

Vaccinating for influenza or pneumonia will not protect against contracting COVID-19. However, for individuals who may be immuno-compromised (such as the elderly or patients with respiratory disease), it is recommended that they receive vaccination against influenza and pneumonia to make them less susceptible to disease in general.

Can I help prevent infection by rinsing my nose with saline? 

There is no evidence that rinsing with normal saline will prevent infection. It is helpful to clear the nasal passages when you are fighting a cold, but it will not prevent a respiratory illness. 

Have questions
about Covid-19?

If you have any questions, please call our COVID-19 hotline at 844.258.1820, open every day 7AM-12AM EDT and operated by EHE Health clinicians trained in COVID-19 guidelines per CDC. For after-hours inquiries, please email COVID-19@ehe.health.